An expert is something to be

On June 21 I spoke at a symposium in Seattle to a small but dedicated audience, a few of whom had read my book and made special efforts to be in the audience. I was supported too by my colleague and great friend Anne Lusk, a behind-the-scenes star of the American trail and cycle track revolution, who extends me with her brilliant mind. After Seattle I went with Anne back to Harvard for a week as a visiting scientist—my second stint there with her team. Liveable Streets Boston organised a “meet Steven” night at a local pub that attracted the city’s chief transport planner, bike-share director and cycle-track engineer. Anne and I also gave seminars to the developers of Boston’s incredible Seaport redevelopment project, who were genuinely interested in our research. Then it was on to New York to spend the weekend cycling around Queens discovering forgotten sites I believe are of special interest to bicycle focused brownfield redevelopment. I spent considerable time with a contingent from New London Architecture who have cycled across the US on a kind of grand tour cum two-wheel derive.

From left: Paul Steely White (trans-alt), Alison Cohen (NYC bike share), me, Peter Murray (NLA), Alex Washburn (Chief Urban Designer NYC).

From left: Paul Steely White (trans-alt), Alison Cohen (NYC bike share), me, Peter Murray (NLA), Alex Washburn (Chief Urban Designer NYC).

A highlight was speaking at the Centre for Architecture—the American Institute of Architects’ headquarters in New York. Other speakers were the heads of New London Architecture, Citi-Bike and Transportation Alternatives. New York’s chief urban designer moderated the panel discussion afterward, that I was a part of. My motivation for blogging since 2009, was to reach precisely the point I have now reached. I’m not sure what the motivation might be from hereon. My hit count has been dwindling, proportionate to my dwindling efforts. I certainly get fewer comments. But then, I’ve stopped trying to be so hilarious as I was as a blogger two years ago. Somewhere in there I became the world’s leading expert of the nexus between architecture and cycling — which I guess is something to be. Futurama for bikes